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I finished my Lucky quilt this weekend and I’m very pleased with how it turned out.  Can’t wait to snuggle up with this when the crisp, fall weather sets in!

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The Lucky pattern design is by Camille Roskelley, and if interested, you can purchase the downloadable pattern on her websiteBelow I have outlined some of the steps involved in creating my quilt, but if you need in-depth coverage of quilt construction, I highly recommend taking Camille’s Craftsy class, Pre-Cut Piecing Made Easy.  I completed this class last summer, and she will cover making a quilt from start to finish, even pin basting and quilting.  Good beginner class, and if you are interested, I did a blog write-up on the class here.

The Lucky quilt pattern consists mainly of half-square triangles (HST). If you haven’t worked with HSTs, I have attached a YouTube tutorial video by Jenny from Missouri Start Quilt at the bottom of this post that is very good.  Camille also covers HSTs in her class that I linked to above.  Note: I reduced the pattern quilt size by 1/3 and the finished quilt fits perfectly on a twin bed or for a couch throw.

Here is a photo of my completed HST blocks.  (You can click on the below photos to see a larger image.)

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After completing my squares, I layed out my block pattern and started sewing the blocks together.

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First, sew in two rows of two, and then sew rows together to make 8 inch blocks.

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Ater you have all your 8″ blocks completed, sew 4 different blocks together as shown below to make one large block.

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I then finished up my sashings and completed my quilt top assembly.  I LOVE quilt top piecing!

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Next up is my least favorite part of quilting, but a necessary evil, pin basting.  I usually baste my quilt on a table as shown below.

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A couple of good pin basting tutorials I have come across are by Red Pepper Quilts and Quilters Diary.

I quilted Lucky on my Bernina Aurora 440QE sewing machine, using a free-motion quilting foot and templates.  I have previously shied away from using templates, too many bad experiences using chalk and marking pens until I tried the Frixion Pilot pens.  They are quite magical — easy to mark with, and can be removed from your fabric with the touch of a hot iron.  As with any marking pen, you should test on your fabric first to make sure it does not leave a residue.

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The best machine quilting class I have taken so far is Design It, Quilt It with Cindy Needham on Craftsy.  She covers template and free-motion quilting and also offers many quilting tips and techniques that are invaluable.  She also does a comprehensive tutorial on table top pin basting that I now use for most projects.  Much easier on these old knees and back!

That pretty much wraps up this blog post on my Lucky Quilt.

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Please share, comment, and offer tips below.  Happy Sewing!

Teri of The Hummingbird Thread

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 Half-Square Triangle Tutorial

 

Piece of Cake Quilt

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